Classical Music Lovers: Celebrate Valentine’s Day with Emerald City Music & The Aizuri Quartet

Emerald City Music is “Seattle’s home for eclectic, intimate, and awesome classical music experiences. Deemed “the beacon for the casual-classical movement” (CityArts), ECM hosts world-renowned musicians in an open bar, chic downtown SLU concert setting.”

Emerald City Music is offering three upcoming performances in February, March & May. I’m gifting my parents a Valentine’s Day present to see “The Aizuri Quartet: 2019 Grammy Nominees” on February 14.  Tickets here.

Details about The Aizuri Quartet: 2019 Grammy Nominees, in their own words:

February 14, 2020 (8pm)

415 Westlake, Seattle

The Aizuri Quartet has taken the classical music scene by storm, garnering top prizes at the prestigious M-Prize Chamber Arts Competition (2018) and receiving a Grammy nomination for their album, Blueprinting.

Antonín Dvořák Selections from Cypresses

Lembit Beecher These Memories May Be True

Rhiannon Giddens At the Purchaser’s Option

Jean Sibelius String Quartet, “Voces Intimae”

Komitas Vartabed Armenian Folk Songs (selections)

Each selection of the program is used to carefully craft a heartfelt letter addressed to the space deeply nestled within our hearts, minds, and memories we call “home.” Intimate love songs by Dvořák (arranged for string quartet) and the nostalgic, soulful folk songs by Armenian composer Komitas Vartabed serve as bookends for the program, each containing a deep expression of homeland. Beecher’s These Memories May Be True was inspired by fragments of Estonian culture, songs and stories passed down to him by his grandmother that create, according to the composer, a “sense of something beautiful that has been lost in the wash of time.” Rhiannon Giddens depicts the visceral tragedy of a young woman and her child being sold as slaves in her work “At the Purchaser’s Option,” and is juxtaposed by Sibelius’ expression of psychological anguish and longing for serenity in “Voces Intimae.” Tickets here.

“a quartet of expert collaborators, who cogently traverse a range of repertoire staples and modern works.” – New York Times

ecm

Future Emerald City Music shows include “Evolution” on March 27 and “What You Are To Me” On May 1.

“EVOLUTION follows the significant thread of influence and development of the keyboard throughout the history of Western classical music. Featuring the harpsichord, piano, and the modern-day synthesizer, this evening is packed full of both iconic and eclectic keyboard tunes, offering a unique journey from the Renaissance to the minimalism of the 20th century with Jeremy Jordan, Henry Kramer, Vicky Chow, and Kenneth Weiss as your guides. J

 

WHAT YOU ARE TO ME is “A landmark collaboration between three national arts organizations, the season finale features a world-premiere by Philadelphia-based composer Patrick Castillo bookended by three decidedly unique gems of the chamber music library. Bohuslov MARTINU Variations on a theme by Rossini for cello and piano Sergei PROKOFIEV Sonata for two violins Patrick CASTILLO Winter Light (world premiere) Erich KORNGOLD Suite for two violins, cello, and piano left hand WHAT YOU ARE TO ME, the final installment of Season Four, is a collection of works that give voice to ideas of displacement, existential doubt within difficult socio-political climates, and the tragedy of conflict and war. Martinu’s usage of a theme from Moses in Egypt for his Variations is perhaps apropos to his own exodus from war-torn Europe to the United States in 1942. Prokofiev’s Sonata for two violins represents the composer wrestling with acquiescence to the political forces of the Soviet Union and maintaining an individual voice. Inspired by Ingmar Bergman’s film Winter Light (1963), Castillo’s world-premiere explores similar existential questions and spiritual doubt in the face of a fraught socio-political climate.

More details about Emerald City Music on their website, emeraldcitymusic.org.

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